The federal government of the United States of America has the mandate of governing the country. It is in charge of 50 states, as well as the capital of Washington, D.C, and several overseas territories. The government consists of the executive, the legislative, and the judiciary. The country is governed by the principles of republicanism and federalism, meaning that each state has its own government with the federal government playing a more senior role. It is a democratic state whose leaders are chosen through an electoral process. The first government was founded in 1789 making it one of the oldest democracies in the world.

What Does the Election Process Look Like?

The president of the United States can serve for a maximum of two four year terms. Eligible citizens vote for the members of the electoral college who then cast their vote for the preferred presidential candidate. Congress consists of 535 members, as well as 100 senators and 435 representatives. Each state has two senators who serve a six-year term. The members of the House of Representatives serve a two year term with each representing a single constituency.

Where Is the House of Paliament Found?

Washington, D.C. serves as the seat of the government. It was created by the Residence Act on July 16, 1790, when the states Maryland of Virginia succeeded land to create the District. Washington was named after the first president of the country, George Washington. The Congress, the office of the President, the Supreme Court, federal offices, and several foreign embassies are located in the District. The president resides at the White House while serving terms. It is located in 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C., and has been the official residence and workplace of the U.S president since 1800 when president John Adams took office as the second president of the U.S.

What Are the Political Parties of the Country?

The political landscape of the United States is generally dominated by two major political parties: the Democratic Party and the Republican Party. However, other lesser-known political parties, known as "third parties" include the Constitution Party, the Green Party, and the Libertarian Party,.

This page was last modified on February 7th, 2018